Tag Archives: Dutkiewicz

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Kīlauea Lava Fuels Phytoplankton Bloom off Hawaiʻi Island

A new study led by Samuel T. Wilson from the University of Hawai’i, co-authored with  Darwin Project researchers John Casey, Stephanie Dutkiewicz, Mick Follows, Christopher Hill, and Oliver Jahn, uses the Darwin ecosystem model embedded within an MITgcm (~2 km) resolution regional physical model of the North Pacific Ocean to study how the input of silicic acid, iron, nitrate, and phosphate along the southeast coast of Hawai‘i impacts nearby phytoplankton productivity. Continue reading

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Fourth Annual Traits Workshop

Reporting by Helen Hill for the MIT Darwin Project

The fourth Workshop on Trait-Based Approaches to Ocean Life, held August 18-21, 2019 at Chicheley Hall in Buckinghamshire in the UK was a wonderful opportunity for Darwin Group members to catch up with former colleagues while sharing current directions in marine ecology viewed through a traits lens.

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What you Can Do With a Really Rather Realistic Ocean Model

Helen Hill | Darwin Project

It’s been a decade since the inception of the MIT Darwin Project, an alliance between physical oceanographers, biogeochemists and marine microbiologists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The goal of Darwin remains to couple state of the art physical models of global ocean circulation with biogeochemistry and genome-informed models of microbial processes to understand the interplay between different elements of the marine ecosystem leading to observed balances between physiology and the marine environment. Continue reading

Phytoplankton - the foundation of the oceanic food chain. Image courtesy of the NOAA MESA Project.

Plankton can save the ocean. But who will save the plankton?

Read this post by Lauren Hinkel via Oceans@MIT

When it comes to climate change and the oceans, MIT Principal Research Scientist Stephanie Dutkiewicz weighs in on why it’s not just warming oceans we need to worry about. Plankton — that are crucial for carbon sequestration and oxygen production — have been discovered behaving strangely, but they may point the way to better geoengineering and understanding of trends in marine populations and ecology.

Dutkiewicz’s research examines how the physics and chemistry of the ocean determines phytoplankton biogeography, and how in turn those organisms affect their environment.

Read her comments in New Scientist.