Tag Archives: publication

Jozef I. Nissimov, David Talmy, Liti Haramaty, Helen Fredricks, Ehud Zelzion, Benjamin Knowles, Murat Eren, Rebecca Vandzura, Christien P. Laber, Brittany M. Schieler, Christopher T. Johns, Kuldeep More, Marco J.L. Coolen, Michael J. Follows,  Debashish Bhattacharya, Benjamin A.S. Van Mooy, Kay D. Bidle (2019), Biochemical diversity of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis as a driver of Coccolithovirus competitive ecology, Enviromental Microbiology, doi: 10.1111/1462-2920.14633 Continue reading

2015-10-03 16.00.40

When Phytoplankton Go Hungry

by Helen Hill for MIT CBIOMES

The Redfield ratio, the atomic ratio of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus (C:N:P) in phytoplankton and deep ocean waters, has often been treated as a constant 106:16:1. A new paper involving several CBIOMES co-authors, among them two from the MIT Darwin Group, presents compelling evidence for what causes this ratio to change within phytoplankton. Continue reading

By Richard A. Ingebrigtsen, Department of Arctic and Marine Biology, University of Tromsø - Own work, GFDL, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12614179

Keeping Things the Same

The elemental composition of organic matter is remarkably constant throughout the world’s oceans, but phytoplankton are known to take up nutrients and carbon in quite variable ratios depending on light and nutrient conditions.

In a paper published online in the journal Global Biogeochemical Cycles last month, Darwin Project researchers David Talmy (MIT), Christopher Hill (MIT), Anna Hickman (Univ. of Southampton, England), and Mick Follows (MIT), in a collaboration with Adam Martiny (Univ. of California, Irvine), report on their work  seeking to understand what ecosystem factors could cause the elemental composition of organic matter to remain stable and relatively constant (homeostatic), even when the phytoplankton can have quite variable composition. Continue reading

Dutkiewicz, S., J.J. Morris, M.J. Follows, J. Scott, O. Levitan, S.T. Dyhrman, and I. Berman-Frank, 2015, Impact of Ocean Acidification on the Structure of Future Phytoplankton CommunitiesNature Climate Change, doi: 10.1038/nclimate2722