Category Archives: Climate Change

Dean Roemmich, Matthew H. Alford, Hervé Claustre, Kenneth Johnson, Brian King, James Moum, Peter Oke, W. Brechner Owens, Sylvie Pouliquen, Sarah Purkey, Megan Scanderbeg, Toshio Suga, Susan Wijffels, Nathalie Zilberman, Dorothee Bakker, Molly Baringer, Mathieu Belbeoch, Henry C. Bittig, Emmanuel Boss, Paulo Calil, Fiona Carse, Thierry Carval, Fei Chai, Diarmuid Ó. Conchubhair, Fabrizio d’Ortenzio, Giorgio Dall’Olmo, Damien Desbruyeres, Katja Fennel, Ilker Fer, Raffaele Ferrari, Gaël Forget, Howard Freeland, Tetsuichi Fujiki, Marion Gehlen, Blair Greenan, Robert Hallberg, Toshiyuki Hibiya, Shigeki Hosoda, Steven Jayne, Markus Jochum, Gregory C. Johnson, KiRyong Kang, Nicolas Kolodziejczyk, Arne Körtzinger, Pierre-Yves Le Traon, Yueng-Djern Lenn, Guillaume Maze, Kjell Arne Mork, Tamaryn Morris, Takeyoshi Nagai, Jonathan Nash, Alberto Naveira Garabato, Are Olsen, Rama Rao Pattabhi, Satya Prakash, Stephen Riser, Catherine Schmechtig, Claudia Schmid, Emily Shroyer, Andreas Sterl, Philip Sutton, Lynne Talley, Toste Tanhua, Virginie Thierry, Sandy Thomalla, John Toole, Ariel Troisi, Thomas W. Trull, Jon Turton, Pedro Joaquin Velez-Belchi, Waldemar Walczowski, Haili Wang, Rik Wanninkhof, Amy F. Waterhouse, Stephanie Waterman, Andrew Watson, Cara Wilson, Annie P. S. Wong, Jianping Xu and Ichiro Yasuda (2019), On the Future of Argo: A Global, Full-Depth, Multi-Disciplinary Array, Frontiers of Marine Science, doi: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00439 Continue reading

Andrea Storto, Aida Alvera-Azcárate, Magdalena A. Balmaseda, Alexander Barth, Matthieu Chevallier, Francois Counillon, Catia M. Domingues, Marie Drevillon, Yann Drillet, Gaël Forget, Gilles Garric, Keith Haines, Fabrice Hernandez, Doroteaciro Iovino, Laura C. Jackson, Jean-Michel Lellouche, Simona Masina, Michael Mayer, Peter R. Oke, Stephen G. Penny, K. Andrew Peterson, Chunxue Yang and Hao Zuo (2019), Ocean Reanalyses: Recent Advances and Unsolved ChallengesFrontiers of Marine Science, doi: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00418 Continue reading

A swirling mass of Pacific jack mackerel, Trachurus symmetricus form a "bait ball" which draws feeding seabirds and marine mammals. (photo: Gulf of the Farallones NMS) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Trachurus_symmetricus_baitball.jpg)

Artificial Intelligence Helps Manage Global Fisheries

Reporting by Helen Hill for the MIT Darwin Project

Fisheries provide a significant source of protein for over half of the world’s human population, yet the impacts of historical overfishing and climate change challenge the future productivity of the world’s oceans. Traditional fisheries management rests on the assumption that the future will look like the past, however, with advances in AI (artificial intelligence) and burgeoning data resources, scientists have new tools for exploring a greater range of future scenarios, including climate change.  Continue reading

Climate Change will Change the Color of the Ocean Research Says

Climate Change will Change the Color of the Ocean Researcher says

MIT Darwin Project researcher, Principal Research Scientist Stephanie Dutkiewicz, talks to WGBH’s Living Lab Radio about her recent Ocean colour signature of climate change paper in Nature Communications.

Dutkiewicz, S., A.E. Hickman, O. Jahn, E. Moneir, S. Henson, and C. Beaulieu (2019), Ocean colour signature of climate changeNature Communications, doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-08457-x

phytoplankton-chips

Phytoplankton & Chips

Helen Hill | Darwin Project

Microbes mediate the global marine cycles of elements, modulating atmospheric CO2 and helping to maintain the oxygen we all breath yet there is much about them scientists still don’t understand. Now, an award from the Simons Foundation will give researchers from the Darwin Project access to bigger, better computing resources to model these communities and probe how they work. Continue reading